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Recipe: Mad Alchemist Savage Remedy (Dry Stout)

2014 June 7
by Mad Alchemist

Frankly, this recipe is as yet untested. I’ll try to update this post with taste notes in a few months when the beer is ready. I’m brewing tomorrow.

Mad Alchemist Savage Stout is a not-to-style dry stout that utilizes rye and oak cubes sanitized in rye whiskey. It is intended to be a rye-forward, relatively bitter beer with an initially slightly-sour and spicy impression that dries on the tongue then rounds out with an oak tinge.

Ingredients

  • 2-Row Pale Malt (7 lbs)
  • Flaked Barley (2 lbs)
  • Rye Malt (1 lb)
  • Crystal Rye (1 lb)
  • Special Roast (1 lb)
  • Midnight Wheat (12 oz)
  • Chocolate Rye (8 oz)
  • Hops: Magnum (1.5 oz @ 60 mins for Bittering)
  • Yeast: Dry English Ale
  • Water: Balanced Chloride/Sulfate Ratio (favor Sulfate a little bit)
  • Mash: 151°F at ~1.5 qt/lb. Target pH is ~5.4

Target Profile

  • Original Gravity: 16.68° Plato (1.068 SG)
  • Final Gravity: 3.84° Plato (1.015 SG)
  • Color: 42 SRM
  • Bitterness: 68 IBU
  • Alcohol: 7.1%
  • Carbonation: 2.5 Vols (favor it a bit lower to stay truer to stout. I usually carbonate high in bottles because you can pour hard straight down the middle of the glass to get rid of excess carbonation)

Oak Cubes
2 oz Medium American. On brew day, put them in a sealed container with enough Rye Whiskey (I’m using Bulleit) to cover the cubes. Shake it up every now and then. After 1 week of fermentation, add the oak cubes to the fermentor along with the Rye Whiskey, and leave them in there for the remaining two weeks of fermentation.

Fermentation
Ferment at 65°F for ~2 weeks, raise it to 70 for the last couple days of that two weeks, then crash it down to ~34 over the course of a week. Bottle/keg and age for ~3 months to allow the flavors to meld and harsher characteristics to mellow out.

Update
This turned out quite well. Quite well indeed. It is smooth as silk despite trying to savage your tastebuds. The bitterness is significant, but you can only really notice that it’s there if you’re looking for it. This is one of my favorite beers I’ve brewed. In addition to the yeast listed above, I also used pouch of Wyeast London Ale (no starter, so I had about 1/4 as much of this as White Labs Dry English Ale) to add complexity and ensure proper fermentation.

I would summarize this as a big, bold, rich, dry stout with significant complexity and smoothed edges.

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